Accountability for reasonableness in an institutional setting

Gry Wester, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Bergen

Many countries have adopted a practice whereby designated institutions play a key role in making decisions about health care priority-setting. The appropriate procedure by which such bodies should make their decisions in order to ensure legitimacy and fairness has been much discussed.  In particular, Daniels and Sabin’s influential framework for procedural justice, ‘Accountability for Reasonableness’ (AFR), has been prominent in the debate [1]. The AFR specifies four conditions that a decision-making procedure must meet in order to be fair and legitimate: the Publicity Condition, the Relevance Condition, the Revisions and Appeals Condition, and the Regulative Condition. While the strengths and weaknesses of the framework have been widely discussed, the question of how well the framework lends itself to use in a real-world institutional setting has received much less attention. There is often an implicit expectation of a higher standard of reasoning or deliberation in such public decision-making institutions – yet decision-making in a real-world institutional setting may be subject to a range of constraints and challenges that typically do not apply in the context of private reasoning. It is worth considering, therefore, how well the conditions set out in the AFR, and the concerns that they embody, map on to or capture the complexities of practice.

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Accountability for reasonableness in an institutional setting

What are we talking about? Clarifying calls for “public discussion” about emerging technologies

Matthew McCoy, Postdoctoral Fellow in Advanced Biomedical Ethics, Penn University

Earlier this year, an expert committee convened by the U.S. National Academies of Science and Medicine published a report on the science, ethics, and governance of human genome editing. Peppered throughout the report’s 200-plus pages were repeated references to the need for more “public discussion” about ethical issues raised by human genome editing.[1]

Continue reading “What are we talking about? Clarifying calls for “public discussion” about emerging technologies”

What are we talking about? Clarifying calls for “public discussion” about emerging technologies